Sign Up for Weekly Blog Updates
* = required field
NCTA

April 16, 2015


Broadband & Internet

How Broadband Competition is Really Technology Competition

April 16, 2015

On NCTA.com’s Broadband By the Numbers page, we show that 88 percent of Americans have access to at least two wired Internet service providers and 98 percent have access to at least two mobile wireless providers. Not to mention 97 percent have access to at least three mobile providers. These are impressive stats, but only tell part of the story.

BroadbandCompetition

If we look a bit closer, we also see technological diversity between those home broadband competitors. According to NTIA, 58 percent of U.S. households have access to at least 10 Mbps DSL. Another 27 percent have access to those speeds from fixed wireless service and 25 percent from fiber. Additionally, 24 percent of households have access to 25 Mbps via fiber, 17 percent via DSL, and 14 percent via fixed wireless. So not only do 88 percent of Americans have access to at least two wired Internet service providers, consumers often have a choice among a range of technology platforms.

This is particularly important when we look to the future of high-speed broadband in America. As our Internet needs increase, we need to incentivize the development of more technologies -newer, faster technologies. Turning broadband into a utility as the FCC has done increases the chances that it won’t ever change – that broadband technology is done evolving. Obviously that’s not the case – both today and in the future.


Public Policy

Why We Are Appealing The FCC’s Title II Decision

@chairmanpowell

April 14, 2015

Today, NCTA filed a Petition for Review of the FCC’s February 26, 2015 order which reclassified broadband Internet service as a public utility, or telecommunications service, under Title II of the Communications Act. We filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

So why are we appealing? It has nothing to do with net neutrality. Indeed, for the better part of two decades our companies have invested billions of dollars into building, maintaining, and improving an open Internet experience for our customers. Our industry has supported the FCC’s original open Internet principles and the 2010 order, which we did not appeal. And we have continued to live by the Open Internet rules even after the courts rejected them.

Unfortunately, the FCC’s recent action goes well beyond restoring enforceable rules, and contrary to Congress’ direction, forces an outdated regulatory model on today’s modern Internet. Among the harms, Title II could lead to the imposition of rate regulation, higher taxes and fees, increased cost of broadband deployment and the ability for government to set the terms and conditions of business relationships. The enormous breadth and ambiguity of the FCC’s new-found power will create uncertainty and conflict for years to come; depressing investment in new and better networks, and chilling development of new technologies, apps and services. Given the sweeping implications for the entire Internet, we believe the Commission’s action must be reviewed by the courts.

We do not relish the prospect of costly litigation or lingering business uncertainty. And for that reason, we are encouraged by the recent statements made by several Congressional leaders acknowledging the constructive role that Congress can play in adopting permanent, enforceable net neutrality rules without the harmful consequences that Title II brings. But regrettably, until that time, it will fall to the courts to protect consumers from the misguided action of the FCC.

John Solit

@johnsolit

April 10, 2015


Industry News

Gigasphere: The Technology Behind Gigabit Broadband

@johnsolit

April 10, 2015

Recently we announced “Gigasphere,” the new consumer-facing name representing DOCSIS 3.1 technology. DOCSIS 3.1 is the technology specifications developed by CableLabs that enables broadband speeds up to 10 gigabits per second, reduces network delays due to congestion, and improves cable modem energy efficiency. For something so impressive, it certainly deserves a better name than DOCSIS 3.1 – hence Gigasphere.

Now we’re pleased to take the cover off of a brand new microsite featuring the story behind (and revealing the future of) super speeds through Gigasphere technology.

Gigasphere.com asks the question, how do you use the Internet today? Since broadband was introduced almost twenty years ago, our broadband needs have expanded exponentially. Streaming video, online gaming, telemedicine, and the Internet of Things have transformed how we see the Internet and have challenged how we deliver it. With Gigasphere technology, the same cable that we now use for broadband can be re-engineered to deliver multi-gig speeds and expansive capacities capable of catapulting us well into the future. Though Gigasphere is still in development, ISPs are already adopting the technology and plan on deploying soon.

But even before then, cable ISPs are jumping headfirst into gigabit broadband. Just last week we reported that Comcast announced a new fiber-to-the-home solution that will deliver up to two gig broadband to select communities, starting with Atlanta. It doesn’t use Gigasphere, but according to Comcast, Gigasphere will offer scalable next-gen gigabit capabilities starting in 2016 to all Comcast customers. That’s on top of Brighthouse’s announcement to bring gigabit broadband to Tampa and Cox, which is already offering gig service to Southern California and soon to Phoenix.

However it comes, gigabit broadband is coming. And it’s coming soon.


Industry News

A Look Inside U.S. TV Households

@juliannetwin

April 8, 2015

Nielsen’s latest The Total Audience Report dives into the changing TV and media landscape with increased competition among the growing list of services. One of the most interesting charts in this report looks inside U.S. TV homes to see what other services consumers are adopting.

InsideUSTV-01

What stands out to us is that 75% of U.S. homes with a TV also have a broadband Internet connection. That means that U.S. households that have TV service are more likely to also have broadband service, as broadband adoption in the U.S. currently stands at 70%. It is also interesting to note that 40% of U.S. TV homes also have an OTT streaming service such as Netflix or Amazon Prime. Additionally, 35% of U.S. TV homes have broadband but no OTT service, as they value a high-speed Internet connection as more than just a means to stream an OTT services.

What do you make of this chart? Let us know in the comments section below.

NCTA

April 6, 2015


Industry News

The Technology Behind Baseball on Opening Day

April 6, 2015

Here’s how the game goes from field to screen. Spring is in full swing, which means one thing: baseball is back. — And it’ll be with us through the fall; over the coming months each team will battle it out over 162 games, which equates to roughly 7,300 hours of play — plus playoffs. While you…


Industry News

Online Video Rides Mobile Tidal Wave

@juliannetwin

April 3, 2015

TV Everywhere has expanded the video experience to any screen, at any time, and anywhere. And mobile online video viewing in particular is leading the way. Adobe’s recently released U.S. Digital Video 2014 Inaugural Report captures this fascinating online video trend. When it comes to authenticated video, which includes online apps and websites that require…

John Solit

@johnsolit

April 2, 2015


Industry News

Comcast Ups Cable’s Gigabit Parade

@johnsolit

April 2, 2015

Cable’s plan to deliver gigabit broadband speeds to residential customers has been in the formative stages for years as improved technology is making wide-scale deployment more possible. But even before the next generation software platform known as Gigasphere is market ready, several cable operators are pushing ahead with significant gigabit offerings. Last year Brighthouse announced…