Congress should act to ensure Net Neutrality

Why Congress Should Act
to Ensure Net Neutrality

TITLE II: YEARS OF UNCERTAINTY, LITIGATION AND CONSUMER HARM

The Internet is the fastest deploying technology in world history. It's a 21st Century engine of innovation that provides an open platform for entrepreneurs, visionaries, and kids in their garages to follow their dreams. And it didn't happen by accident.

The Internet works for Americans because government had wisely chosen to let the web grow and thrive without burdensome regulation that can increase consumer bills, choke progress and smother innovation. But instead of continuing this path of tremendous success, the FCC recently approved a massive regulatory regime that piles on thousands of new rules all in the name of preserving net neutrality. These rules, called Title II, aren't necessary for net neutrality and they certainly aren't going to increase competition or make the Internet faster, better or more innovative.

The FCC's unnecessary action is legally questionable and will result in years of litigation and marketplace uncertainty. The good news is that Congress can act to deliver the permanent net neutrality protections that consumers are demanding.

Learn More: Watch The Video

What is net neutrality and who supports it? Watch the video to learn more about what net neutrality means, why Internet Service Providers support it and why it is time for Congress to step in pass bipartisan legislation that will protect consumers and keep the Internet free from burdensome regulations that will slow investment, innovation and new services.

Want to make your voice heard? Take action at unitedforanopeninternet.com.

TELL CONGRESS TO MAKE
NET NEUTRALITY PERMANENT

With Title II, the FCC has imposed heavy new Internet regulation that goes far beyond widely supported net neutrality protections. Title II will increase consumer costs, slow investment and innovation and cause years of uncertainty. But Congress can step in. Bipartisan legislation can protect consumers while promoting the investment needed to continue expanding and improving America’s broadband networks. Let's choose a future that embraces progress, not expensive regulations.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT THE NET NEUTRALITY CONGRESSIONAL SOLUTION

"The FCC's new rules weaken - or reverse - decades of minimal regulation, during which the Internet flourished. As often as not, economic regulation has adverse, unintended side effects. That was true of the railroads, and it may be true of the Internet."

BE SKEPTICAL OF 'NET NEUTRALITY' | By Robert J. Samuelson at The Washington Post [article]

George Gilder, economist and author of Telecosm said: "We've had 15 years of marvelous success, just stunning success on the Internet. . . Our seven top technology companies are all related to the Internet. The US has four times the investment in fixed broadband than Europe, with its government intervention, and twice the investment in wireless. Most of Internet traffic in the world flows through the US. What on earth is wrong that the FCC thinks it has to reduce it to a public utility?"

INTERNET PIONEERS DECRY TITLE II RULES | By LightReading [article]

"It would be better if Congress finally did its job and agreed on a legislated plan that avoids more bureaucratic wrangling."

SETTLE THE NET-NEUTRALITY DEBATE WITH LEGISLATION | Editorial by The Washington Post [article]

"It was a problem that wasn't broken, didn't need fixing. . . This is another process for government officials, elected officials, to create unneeded controversy so that they can get both sides of the argument to donate a heck of a lot of money to keep themselves in power, and continue to drive the regulation economy."

SCOTT MCNEALY, CO-FOUNDER OF SUN MICROSYSTEMS AND CHAIRMAN OF WAYIN, ON REGULATION OF THE INTERNET | CNBC [video]

Net Neutrality Timeline: Where We Are & How We Got Here

1999-2015

  • 1999
    99

    July 20, 1999

    FCC Chairman Kennard, appointed by President Clinton, establishes a policy of a light regulatory touch for the Internet's early days.

  • 2002
    02

    March 14, 2002

    FCC Chairman Michael Powell classifies broadband Internet access as a Title I interstate information service.

  • 2003
    03

    June 5, 2003

    Law professor Tim Wu coins the term “net neutrality” in his paper “Network Neutrality, Broadband Discrimination.”

  • 2004
    04

    February 8, 2004

    FCC Chairman Powell introduces “Four Internet Freedoms,” Freedom to (1) access content; (2) run applications; (3) attach devices; (4) obtain service plan information.

  • 2005
    05

    March 3, 2005

    The FCC negotiates an agreement with Madison River Communication where Madison River agrees to “refrain from blocking” phone calls.

  • 2005
    05

    June 27, 2005

    In FCC vs. Brand X, the Supreme Court upholds FCC’s authority to define the classification of broadband as an information service under Title I.

  • 2005
    05

    September 23, 2005

    FCC reclassifies Internet access across the phone network, including DSL, as a Title I information service.

  • 2008
    08

    August 1, 2008

    Comcast vs. BitTorrent decision by FCC Chairman Martin – FCC hands Comcast a cease-and-desist order.


  • 2010
    10

    April 6, 2010

    U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit dismisses the FCC's cease and desist order against Comcast.

  • 2010
    10

    December 21, 2010

    FCC Open Internet Order makes net neutrality rules official FCC regulation for the first time.

  • 2014
    14

    January 14, 2014

    In Verizon vs. FCC, DC Circuit rules that as a Title I information service, FCC has no authority to adopt net neutrality regulations.

  • 2014
    14

    November 10, 2014

    President Obama calls on the FCC to reclassify broadband as Title II.

  • 2015
    15

    February 26, 2015

    FCC votes to 3-2 to classify the Internet as a public utility under Title II of The Communications Act.

Swipe left or right to explore timeline
EXPLORE THE TIMELINE V

America's Internet Progress

Total U.S. Broadband Industry Investment Since 1996

Building a Faster Internet:
Top Residential Speeds Offered by Cable (Mbps)

Infograph: Top Residential Speeds Offered by Cable (Mbps)